Mooshi Mooshi?
14 stories
·
1 follower

Why headset VR will not work

1 Comment
Comments URL: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11795913
Read the whole story
cnf
2068 days ago
reply
This puts into words what I have thought for quite some time.
Antwerpen, Belgium
Share this story
Delete

Take Nothing, Leave Nothing: On being banned from the world’s most remote island

1 Share
Comments URL: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9449215
Read the whole story
cnf
2465 days ago
reply
Antwerpen, Belgium
Share this story
Delete

Google Will Buy Your Patent

1 Share

patent

Google is offering to buy patents in a “simple, easy to use and fast” process while letting the seller continue using the relevant technology. It’s billing it as a way to combat patent trolls, but it’s by no means an act of philanthropy.

According to Google, the purpose of the program is to deal with situations where people who come up with patented technologies either want or need to quickly sell the patent, for example to solve cashflow problems. It argues that at the moment such sellers will usually find the only viable option is selling to a patent troll (also known as a non-practicing entity): a company that holds patents solely to use as a legal weapon rather than to manufacture or develop technology.

Google’s answer, the Patent Purchase Promotion, will run as an experiment from May 8 through May 22, during which any patent holder can offer a patent to Google and name their own non-negotiable price. Google will then make a decision in principle by June 26 about which patents to buy. It then has a target of completing all purchases and handing over the cash by the end of August.

While it’s designed as a streamlined and simplified process, Google points out that “selling patents is serious business” and recommends that all potential sellers consult an attorney. One of the key conditions is that the purchase process on offer is very one-sided: simply by submitting a patent and price, the seller is committing to selling at that price, but Google retains the right to pull out of the deal at any stage before completion.

The good news is that as part of any purchase, the seller retains a licence to use the patented technology. This lasts forever and applies worldwide, with no licensing fees or royalties required, but isn’t transferable.

Google isn’t making any firm commitments about what it will do with the patents, other than to say they’ll be added to its general portfolio. This means Google could develop technology itself or license the patent to other firms (including rivals of the original seller.) Google has previously pledged to only ever use patents defensively in court, meaning it won’t sue an alleged violator unless it sues Google first, but that pledge is likely not legally binding.

The post Google Will Buy Your Patent appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

Read the whole story
cnf
2466 days ago
reply
Antwerpen, Belgium
Share this story
Delete

Cold

2 Comments and 5 Shares

The worst cold I’ve had in a decade is beginning its third week. I knew we were screwed as soon as I dropped my kid off at preschool and saw one of his classmates visibly very sick. Fortunately, my kid and wife get over viruses quickly, so they were fine in less than a week.

I started thinking, in my miserable feel-like-I-have-a-fever-but-I-don’t state tonight (during which I probably shouldn’t be blogging, but oh well), what a shame it is that people build up immunities to viruses throughout their entire lives, but when they die, all of that progress is lost, and every new person needs to start all that work from scratch. How incredible would it be if we could somehow capture and recreate those immunities so future generations wouldn’t get these viruses?

It only took a few more seconds before my cold-impaired mind realized that it had just invented vaccines, they already exist, and they’re amazing. Because even though we haven’t found a vaccine for colds yet (and probably won’t), the common cold is mostly a minor inconvenience. Vaccines for much more deadly viruses have existed for decades, most work extremely well with effectively zero risk, and they have saved millions of lives.

Vaccines are truly one of humanity’s greatest and most important accomplishments.

It’s tragic, dangerous, and incredibly destructive that society is needlessly regressing on this front. I’m sadly confident that anti-intellectualism and shunning of widely proven scientific data, selfishly and shamelessly encouraged by entertainers and politicians to advance their careers, will prove to be the most damaging and deadly regression of developed society in my lifetime.

We’ve made vaccination a “personal choice” because anything else is too expensive, politically. Parents refusing vaccines are so numerous now that we can’t protect ourselves from them. We can’t know if the next visit to the doctor or the next day at school will expose us to a dangerous disease that was nearly eradicated a few years ago but is now, tragically and stupidly, on the rise.

A harmless “personal choice” doesn’t damage others. The color of your pants is a personal choice. Vaccine denial isn’t — it’s a severe risk to the public’s health and safety. Not just to the deniers — to everyone.

Refusing vaccines isn’t new, but it used to be very rare and unheard of. Deniers used to vaguely cite religion (another “personal choice” that often damages innocent bystanders in practice), and nobody really questioned it because religious justification is the ultimate conversation-ender, immune to almost any common-sense challenges or legal restrictions.

But now, being anti-vaccine is just another societally acceptable difference of opinion, a pants color, a team you’re on, an option to tick on your Facebook page. The most scary and dangerous thing about anti-vaxxers today isn’t that they exist — they always have, and always will — it’s that their “personal choice” brings almost no consequences or restrictions (unless their children contract a preventable disease, which I wouldn’t wish on anyone), so they’ll only keep getting more numerous.

I don’t know how to fix this. Government-required vaccines are impractical, invasive, politically impossible, and probably wouldn’t actually be effective — there would certainly be a “religious” exemption, so anti-vaxxers would just go back to conjuring vague religious justifications like they used to.

We can’t make people vaccinate themselves and their children. But we can make that a more expensive proposition for them, and a less dangerous proposition for the rest of us, by speaking out and making unnecessary anti-vax choices less societally acceptable.

Even if that means an occasional tense conversation, even if that means my kid can’t go over to certain friends’ houses, and even if that means schools and doctor’s offices need to start turning people away who make that “personal choice”, we need to push back.

Because next time, it might not be a cold.

Read the whole story
cnf
2543 days ago
reply
Antwerpen, Belgium
Share this story
Delete
2 public comments
adamcole
2543 days ago
reply
"and even if that means schools and doctor’s offices need to start turning people away who make that 'personal choice'"...

Proud to say my kids' pediatrician already does this. One of their first questions: "will you be having your kids vaccinated? Because if not, we have a list of alternative doctors for you."
Philadelphia, PA, USA
onepointzero
2543 days ago
reply
"religious justification is the ultimate conversation-ender, immune to almost any common-sense challenges or legal restrictions" — I will be quoting that.
Brussels, Belgium
trekkie
2543 days ago
yep.
MotherHydra
2543 days ago
I hear that.
AaronLMGoodwin
2543 days ago
As a religious person who *isn't* a denier of reason, these softball lobs at straw men religion kind of irk me. Still, I agree with the overall point of the post. Anti-Vax people are looney.
trekkie
2543 days ago
Unfortunately where I live in NC the reasonable religious people are as rare as Bigfoot. Used to not be the case but I've been yelled at for celebrating Halloween. Vaccines didn't come up until obama said they were good oddly enough.
AaronLMGoodwin
2541 days ago
Oh dear, that sounds awful. I'll pray for you ;-)

1984 v. Brave New World (lettersofnote.com)

1 Share
Comments
Read the whole story
cnf
2652 days ago
reply
Antwerpen, Belgium
Share this story
Delete

Python Practice Book (anandology.com)

1 Share
Comments
Read the whole story
cnf
2722 days ago
reply
Antwerpen, Belgium
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories